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Roadworks This Weekend!

Join us for Roadworks! If you’re near San Francisco, come visit us this weekend! DATE : Sunday, September 28, 2014¬† 11 am – 4 pm. PLACE : Rhode Island Street (between 16th & 17th Streets) in San Francisco COST¬†: FREE! JOIN IN THE FUN: Steamroller printing, 40 craft vendors, family friendly hands-on printing activities for the public, music, art exhibition and more.
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It’s Groundhog Day!!

Well, ok, it may be too late for Groundhog day, and too early for fall Turnips, but it’s always the right time for a sweet furry face. This is part of our new releases that will be in stores this autumn, which means we’re printing it in May and June! Have a great kick-off to summer everyone!
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Booth #1863 at the National Stationery Show

Here’s a sneak peek of one of our new cards. Our new releases for fall and winter include much larger animals than our usual insects. We’ll soon be sharing a bear cub in a redwood tree, a gentle lamb beneath a fig tree, a squirrel eating acorns, a sparrow taking off from the pussy willow branches, this mischievous raccoon snitching corn, and my favorite, a groundhog eating turnips. I will post them as they come out. In the meantime, there are mockups at the National Stationery Show, with our New England sales rep daisyd and friends, in booth #1863. If you’re a buyer attending the show, I hope you get a chance to stop by!    
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An Unusual Way to Grow a Primrose

We thought you might like to see our unusual methods for growing flowers at Painted Tongue Press, so we’ve put together a photo essay about it. We begin by studying photographs of the flower, plant or vegetable that will be the subject of our next card – in this case, primrose. When our card line started out, we used old botanical engravings and illustrations, but all of the recent cards in our line are drawn from scratch, in house, by Kim Vanderheiden. Kim uses the photographs from various sources as a basis for understanding the plant’s nature and behavior, and variations on how it grows. She uses sections of photographs as a basis for the illustrations, but changes elements to suit the needs of the drawing. It’s important to capture the botanical nature of the plant and not copy a photographer’s composition. She draws the plant in vignettes because that plays into the way we create our final composition on the card. Here are the primrose drawings that were used for our card, complete with the little critter. Each card has a critter. Sometimes it’s a small bug. Sometimes it’s something more obvious like a bird or rabbit. After the […]
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